Wine This, Wine That

There is always more to say….

Appellation America Goes Subscription Based
As promised earlier and as reported here, on-line wine magazine Appellation America has now officially gone over to a subscription access model. The groundbreaking literary advocate of terroir-based thinking about wine is charging $49.95 per year for complete access to their original articles, their database of wineries, varieties and appellations and their tasting notes. The move seems a test of whether hard core wine lovers and the wine industry is willing to support online content that is not free.
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Inter-family Wine Squabbling Is Depressing
These are the kinds of stories I most hate reading. Not because I think there ought to be some ethical prohibition on this kind of reporting and not because I'm opposed to the idea of lawsuits (Lord knows I'm not), but because it's just such a painful thing to read about. Father Korbel suing Daughter Korbel. I can think of few things as unfortunate and painful as going head to head with a member of my family. My hope is that it can be resolved. The Hecks are very good folk.

Wine Shipping Advocates Stage Benefit Tasting & Auction in Chicago
Specialty Wine Retailers Association, The Illinois Wine Consumer Coalition, The Chicago Wine Company and Kirkland and Ellis are sponsoring a fundraising and awareness raising wine tasting and auction in Chicago on August 6. The coalition will host 300 wine lovers and supporters of free trade that hope to push that stat to change it's laws concerning the direct shipment of wine to Illinois consumers. The event takes place on August 6 at 5:30pm at the Chicago Cultural Center and costs $100 Per person. Five themed wine tastings, an auction of amazing wines from across the globe, entertainment and nourishment will great supporters. Click here to obtain tickets and get more information.

Bing v. Google On Wine
Microsoft's new Bing.com search engine appears to be catching no with a number of folks I speak with. Which to use? Luckily we have http://www.bing-vs-google.com to show the way. I did some searches related to wine at the comparison site and found the following: 1. Type in "Wine" and wine.com comes up first on Bing. Winehq, a software application related to Microsoft Windows is first on Google. Interesting. 2. Type in "Napa Valley" and Napa Valley Vintners is nowhere to be found on the initial results of either search engine. Interesting. 3. Type in "Tom Wark" and Bing doesn't show Fermentation first, but rather the Wikipedia entry. Google has Fermentation first and second.

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6 Responses

  1. Arthur - July 13, 2009

    Yet another reason to loose sleep when you are SEO-conscious.

  2. Jeff - July 14, 2009

    I would hesitate to say Appellation America is a test to see if people will support paid wine content.
    I would argue that AA isn’t the test for it.
    They have good traffic, but I would be curious to see their analytics to see where the traffic was coming from.
    As an outsider, I would guess the majority of their traffic is coming from good SEO based on a broad (incredibly broad) range of keywords.
    Search any varietal and they come up near the top of the search and that is fantastic and a credit to them and how they built the web site.
    However, as anybody that studies search engine marketing knows, search traffic is a whole lot different then fans who regularly read content and would be willing to pay for it.
    Jeff

  3. KenPayton - July 14, 2009

    I signed up yesterday. Gotta support those folks.

  4. wedding chair covers - July 14, 2009

    I have found to bing to be much better than Google so far in my recent searches.

  5. Dylan - July 16, 2009

    The squabble between family members is disheartening. When your family becomes your competition who are you left with besides yourself?

  6. Mark - July 20, 2009

    It’s going to be a hard sell these days. What about their content is truly unique that cannot be found for free elsewhere on the net? So many times a company goes subscription because they cannot find any other way to make money off their customers, without it being as invasive.


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