Archive for the ‘Wine Business’ Category

Apr 15, 2005

The Perfect Storm for Cork Arrives

Imagine planting a crop and knowing it will be 40 years before you can harvest its bounty. You’d have to put it in the ground while attending pre-school in order to see a return during your most productive years. It’s just this situation that has led the Portuguese to become fond of the saying, “Plant cork if you love your grandchildren.” Talk about patience. It does take a cork tree in Portugal about 40 years before it is ready to…

Apr 13, 2005

Wine: The Conservative Industry

Yesterday, while walking around the vineyard with my graphic designer and photographer and the client (see the previous post), my client states, out of the blue, "That wind is cold…it’s coming from the North. It’s going to be colder tonight and we’ll get frost." It seemed he was talking to himself. I woke up this morning to find a nice layer of frost and ice on my car and roof of my house. I live in Glen Ellen in the…

Mar 31, 2005

No Parking in Sonoma-That’s a Good Thing

I had a meeting yesterday on the Plaza in the Town of Sonoma yesterday. It took me five minutes to find a place to park and ended up having to walk quite a distance to get to the business on the plaza at which I was meeting. THIS IS GOOD NEWS! Clearly the tourists are back in Sonoma and in Sonoma County as a whole. And you can tell it’s tourists who are taking all my parking spaces. They are…

Mar 15, 2005

Some Thoughts on Wine Competitions

Christian over at Turn the Screw has, as he often does, dished out an interesting post. This time it’s about wine competitions and their usefulness. The point that Christian leans toward, but doesn’t quite say explicitly, is that wine competitions tend to reward wines that are bigger than the rest, but are not necessarily true to varietal form. It’s a good point. Having judged at a few wine competitions I can say that it is daunting work, at least for…

Mar 14, 2005

Arizona Wine Lovers Welcome a Hero

How does a region completely unheralded for wine become better known as a source of high quality wines? It’s generally a very slow process that includes a steady increase in acres under vine, the move from planting obscure to better known varietals, support from locals and finally some sort of acknowledgement of the wines’ quality from a reputable source. But wouldn’t it help if one of America’s most famous vintners suddenly showed up in a state where vineyards were practically…